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National Diabetes Awareness Month – Putting An End To Chronic Diseases

posted Nov 3, 2015, 8:02 PM by Sandy Karlek   [ updated Nov 3, 2015, 8:25 PM ]

Enough is enough!

Over the past 50 years our lifestyle changes have become more and more toxic, slowly fermenting our bodies and creating chronic diseases. With increased physical, emotional and mental toxicity levels in ourselves and the world, we now are forced to shift to a diet with lower sugar content, in effect, creating less fermentation.

November is American Diabetes Awareness month. It is time to proactively create a healthier environment that repels toxicity to avoid facing the tragic consequences of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer, obesity, and arthritis

Below are four (4) things each person can do to live a happier, healthier life:

1.       Eat cleaner, healthier, more natural foods. A general rule of thumb – if you can't pronounce an ingredient on the label, you probably shouldn't eat the food. "A diet of minimally processed foods close to nature, predominantly plants, is decisively associated with health promotion and disease prevention." says Dr David Katz, a nationally recognized nutrition expert.

2.       Take a deep breath. Diaphragmatic breathing will calm the nervous system thus decreasing depression, anger and anxiety as well as improving your heart rate and immune system. Studies have shown that breathing disorders are directly related to an overactive immune system.

3.       Stay hydrated. Your water consumption is directly correlated to your health. Many chronic pains can be, in part, due to dehydration. Water serves a vital role in the everyday operation of cells within a body. Without it, according to Dr. F. Batmangheliei, author of Your Body's Many Cries for Water,the body will manifest varying symptoms, signals and complications now labeled as diseases.”

4.       Exercise.  Exercising both causes and reduces the inflammation in your body. High intensity workouts can actually increase the inflammation in your body potentially resulting in chronic inflammation. To decrease the inflammation in your body you should get on a regular, low impact exercise regime. As your body gets stronger, you can increase the impact (or inflammation), but always allow for recovery time and avoid inflammatory plateaus.

How do I get started?

It is time to consciously begin a daily routine of healthy living, incorporating all four (4) elements listed above. I have found swimming and aquatic exercise to be a great place to begin. The hydrostatic pressures of the water against your lungs actually create a workout for your respiratory muscles increasing your breathing and circulation. Low-impact exercises will build muscle strength, increase flexibility and allow for a cardio workout without the stresses on your joints and ligaments. Gently stretching and exercising in warm water will not only increase your range of motion but will begin the process of decreasing your toxicity levels and reduce the inflammation within your body. 

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